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20110719
20110719
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
place over here in the uk. this is one division that has the big question mark over it, the publishing division, $997 million in 2010, 22% of operating income for the company. we have "the wall street journal" front cover, they purchased that for $5 billion. you have $200 million coming from the uk. not a game changer but whether this spills over into the other businesses that rupert murdoch owns. the next division, u.s. broadcast networks, they have about 37% penetration into u.s. house holds, this represents 9% of the bottom line, $409 million they have, tv stations scattered throughout the united states, again, does it spill over because of reputation? right now analysts we spoke to on wall street say not just yet, last division here, sky italia here, scott mockridge, it represents 4% of the operation, not a game changer but feeds in. bskyb would have brought in 15% of earnings per share in 2012 if the deal would have gone through, been held off for 12 to 18 months and it may not happen at all. you take a step back from all the numbers i hoad you, $636 million loss, about 14% of the
tennessee. can they sell it to the house republicans? >> that's a big question. i think what we saw today both from president obama and someone like lamar alexander is this isolation that going on of the house republicans, saying, look, the gang of six got a deal, that's why president obama went out this to say it. mitch mcconnell's got a backup plan. john boehner and i were kind of working together and, well, who's out of that picture? the house republicans. and the polls are increasingly showing that the house republican point of view is not popular with the american public. i mean, there's a "washington post" out -- poll out tonight that says that more than three-quarters of americans see the republican leadership as being too resistant. >> however, however, let's listen as we go back to kate bolduan on the hill, the democrats are reading the polls. the democratic leadership going to the floor essentially saying, republicans, why are you wasting our time? >> the public has had it with this theater of the absurd that's going on. they want congress to come together as our president has s
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into a full-time job and eventually led to her relationship with murdoch. >>> now to potentially big, big news in washington. debt talks, big news and a very significant step forward today, says president obama, just a short time ago. the president announced the so-called senate gang of six made of members from both parties has floated this new proposal that he, the president, can work with. the bipartisan group had thrown in the towel, ditched an earlier effort to find a debt reduction package okay to both parties and now at this late date 14 days until a potential government default. they're back with a plan that the president says includes deep spending cuts and, yes, also includes tax increases. here's the president. >> here's where we stand. we have a democratic president, an administration that is prepared to sign a tough package that includes both spending cuts, modifications to social security, medicaid, and medicare that would strengthen those systems and allow them to move forward and would include a revenue component. we now have a bipartisan group of senators who agree with that ba
a deal, it starts to weaken the white house i guess. >> reporter: a big deal of deficit reduction obviously is feeling very elusive and chances of doing something like that seem to be very slim at this point. in terms of the debt ceiling, they are very much relying on a plan being worked out by senators reed and mcconnell, top democrat and republican in the senate, to move something forward so the senate can take a lead and the house can then follow suit maybe making some changes. i think right now that's the best hope. i do want to tell you looking at the president's schedule today, it's mighty bare. his normal presidential briefing and meetings with senior advisers but certainly there's a lot of room built in there for any sort of communication he needs to do with congress. >> right. there was talk they are working through the weekend so they are doing everything possible to come to an agreement. >> over night too. >> u.s. and libya hosting secret face to face talks since the libyan conflict began four months ago. the point of the weekend meeting was to send a clear message to m
save hundreds! yeah, that'll certainly stick with me. we'll take it. go, big money! i mean, go. it's your break, honey. same coverage, more savings. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> 15 days until the treasury says it will run out money. a tea party leader says don't raise the debt seeing and he says president obama is lying about the consequences if we don't. "keeping them honest" about what many republicans believe is central to solving the long-term problem. a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. they vote on "cup, cap and balance." cutting spending to 2004 levels and caps it and freezes it right there and calls for a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. >> all that we ask in this bill is that we simply allow the states to weigh in, should the federal government live under a balanced budget amendment. should they do that? >> i don't understand why people won't vote for the a balanced budget amendment because it's the only discipline that will ever force the politics of washington to meet the responsibilities of washington. >> let's do somethi
edited these newspapers in london to get the scoop, to get the big story and to do whatever it took to get that story? >> huge pressure. and i detail that in my book as well. you know, when you're an editor of a british tabloid newspaper, you're in a commercial war and you're encouraged to be aggressive, forceful, to pursue stories with the full mite of your reporting army. but most news organizations are the same. rupert murdoch's happened to be more successful than most over the years. the king for me listening to murdoch, a lot of what he said resonated. people may be bemused by what he said, but when he says he didn't have much day to day contact with these papers, that's true. i spoke to the editors of "news of the world" maybe once a week, once every two weeks. he didn't ask me about methodologies of stories. he would say what's going on and you told him what stories. i had editors, i have managers, i have lawyers, i have accountants. they do all the box ticking here. my job is just to get an overview of what's going on. when you run a company of 50,000 people, it is a bit rid
, no increase in the debt ceiling, pay its bills based on big-ticket items. that would be interest on the debt. social security, medicare and medicaid, defense spenders. unpemt employment insurance. what you'd get under the big-ticket scenario is a drawing off the line. that's your $172 billion. the government is out of money if you don't increase the debt ceiling. what gets cut? military pay. wouldn't get their checks under this scenario. veterans checks, irs refund. if you're waiting for one you wouldn't get it. nutrition services, foods stamps, wouldn't get paid. federal salaries, education department, other and you heard him mention for reason aide to the palestinians. you have to make the choices and cut it off right here. that's one way. suppose you decided instead we'll put a priority on the social safety net. under this scenario, interest gets paid, social security gets paid, medicare and medicaid and those nutrition services that got cut off last time, you could pay them. housing grants would go out. veterans affairs, unemployment, education and tuition assistance. but under this set
responsibilities, we had calls from all the big shareholders -- many big shareholders saying it was a terrible thing to take him away, because he had done such a great job. >> i said it wasn't the ability of james, but the fact that you have been -- you didn't know about so many of these criminal activities that went on, do you not think that was more likely because of this sort of family history? i don't mean james here. i'm talking about people that weren't direct members of your family, but became friends? >> no. >> you don't think that's -- >> i don't. i don't think -- >> it has been mismanaged. >> i don't think he ms. led me for a minute. you must find out for yourself and make your own conclusion. it may have been misleading, but he certainly did not know of anything. >> thank you very much. >> i've got two more members, dana collins. >> thank you. >> before i address my questions to the hearing, i'd like to make a short declaration of my own which i previously declared to the committee. my wife is an employee by edelman engaged by this corporation. i want to share this with you before a
with my old company. saved a bunch. that's a reason to switch. big savings -- it's a good look for you. [ blower whirring ] [blower stops] the safety was off. out there with a better way. now, that's progressive. but i did. they said i couldn't fight above my weight class. but i did. they said i couldn't get elected to congress. but i did. ♪ sometimes when we touch ha ha! millions of hits! [ male announcer ] flick, stack, and move between active apps seamlessly. only on the new hp touchpad with webos. >>> he is one of the world's most powerful media moguls. he is going face-to-face with the most powerful lawmakers in the uk. we are talking about rupert murdoch. he is going to face outraged members of the british parliament who want answers. we are talking about bribery, hacking and corruption of power and like to hear over and over in today's hearing. >>> let's put it in perspective with our jeffrey mccrackin who is a senior business writer with bloomberg news and "businessweek." something i didn't ask you the last time we talked as we started this hour, is just talking about murdoch
, rebekah brooks to testify in house of commons. what can we expect from this? >> the big box office will be rupert murdoch, one of the world's most powerful media moguls, sitting in front of members of parliament in the british house of commons, being cross-examined essentially about what he knew at news international, news corp, about this phone hacking scandal, we are expecting to hear much less from rebekah brooks, former ceo of news international. editor of "news of the world" as with she's already been arrested so there is a police investigation into her conduct and her -- what she's been up to. and so she's going to be much more con stained as to what she'll be able to see legally to the mps, who will be asking questions. also constraints on what the mps can ask rebekah brooks. they don't want to jeopardize the ongoing criminal investigation into what brooks may or may not have done. an interesting day to watch tomorrow. >> matthew chance in london tonight, thank you very much. >>> now more on in-depth coverage. together with sean hoare, paul mcmullan was one of the first to g
forefathers, openly discussed, piers, how they wanted every courtroom in america to be big enough for the entire community to hear the trial. so there is no closed-door justice or secret proceedings. the people that watched this trial, including myself, made their decision, just because it doesn't agree with the jury's decision is a whole other can of worms. but america can listen and hear and evaluate the evidence, just as well as you and i can. so that was their decision. i'm sure you saw the "usa today" poll that 2/3 of americans believe they are guilty. that's their right to have an opinion and voice it. >> nancy, when we come back, i want to talk to you about your days as a prosecutor, and the tragedy that you already referred to that led you to becoming a lawyer in the first place. [ male announcer ] this...is the network -- a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliv
paint a picture for us about how a newspaper like "news of the world" goes about reporting on such a big story, what the level of the editor, deputy editor, senior reporters, would be in putting together a story like that? >> i think any big story, but for the purpose of process, most stories start out with the reporter and that reporter may be being asked by the news editor to go and investigate a story or they may have brought information about a story from their own contacts to the news editor. it is at that stage in a newspaper where the reporter and news editor discuss the veracity of the information, go out and check the allegations and come back with a more considered view. you can imagine that every newspaper gets a lot of information to the news desk and only a percentage, very small percentage, makes it actually to publication. so there are many layers from reporter to assistant news editor to news editor. finally, the story will go to the back bench which will be the people that will oversee the subbing of that story and the sub will often talk to the reporter directly with qu
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)